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From the authors of The Whole-Brain Child and No-Drama Discipline, an indispensable guide to unlocking your child’s innate capacity for resilience, compassion, and creativity.

When facing contentious issues such as screen time, food choices, and bedtime, children often act out or shut down, responding with reactivity instead of receptivity. This is what New York Times bestselling authors Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson call a No Brain response. But our kids can be taught to approach life with openness and curiosity. When kids work from a Yes Brain, they’re more willing to take chances and explore. They’re more curious and imaginative. They’re better at relationships and handling adversity. In The Yes Brain, the authors give parents skills, scripts, and activities to bring kids of all ages into the beneficial “yes” state. You’ll learn

• the four fundamentals of the Yes Brain—balance, resilience, insight, and empathy—and how to strengthen them
• the key to knowing when kids need a gentle push out of a comfort zone vs. needing the “cushion” of safety and familiarity
• strategies for navigating away from negative behavioral and emotional states (aggression and withdrawal) and expanding your child’s capacity for positivity

The Yes Brain is an essential tool for nurturing positive potential and keeping your child’s inner spark glowing and growing strong.

Praise for The Yes Brain

“This unique and exciting book shows us how to help children embrace life with all of its challenges and thrive in the modern world. Integrating research from social development, clinical psychology, and neuroscience, it’s a veritable treasure chest of parenting insights and techniques.” —Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D., author of  Mindset  

“I have never read a better, clearer explanation of the impact parenting can have on a child’s brain and personality.” —Michael Thompson, Ph.D.

“Easily assimilated and informative, the book will help adults enable children to lead physically and emotionally satisfying and well-rounded lives filled with purpose and meaningful relationships. Edifying, easy-to-understand scientific research that shows the benefits that accrue when a child is encouraged to be inquisitive, spirited, and intrepid.” —Kirkus Reviews

Review

“Easily assimilated and informative, the book will help adults enable children to lead physically and emotionally satisfying and well-rounded lives filled with purpose and meaningful relationships. Edifying, easy-to-understand scientific research that shows the benefits that accrue when a child is encouraged to be inquisitive, spirited, and intrepid.” —Kirkus Reviews

“This unique and exciting book shows us how to help children embrace life with all of its challenges and thrive in the modern world. Integrating research from social development, clinical psychology, and neuroscience, it’s a veritable treasure chest of parenting insights and techniques.” —Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D., author of Mindset 

“In today’s busy, competitive culture, allowing our children the space to be themselves is more important than ever. This book provides an escape hatch from the high-stakes mindset. It’s a parent’s guide to ensuring health, happiness, and genuine success—a blueprint for raising confident, creative kids in a fear-based world. It’s never too late to implement the science-based strategies that Dan Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson share.” —Vicki Abeles, producer and co-director, The Race to Nowhere and Beyond Measure
 
“Bottom line: Every parent wants to raise a strong-minded, resilient, caring child. We just don’t know exactly how; we open our mouths and we sing our parents’ tired refrain, ‘No . . . no . . . no.’ In The Yes Brain, Dan Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson teach us how to cultivate a receptive, curious brain in our children. I have never read a better, clearer explanation of the impact parenting can have on a child’s brain and personality.” —Michael Thompson, Ph.D., co-author of Raising Cain
 
“Today’s parents find their children’s behavior mystifying. ‘I never would have spoken that way to—or refused to cooperate with—my parents!’ Using refreshingly clear explanations of neuroscience and child development, coupled with practical, straightforward guidance, The Yes Brain arrives just in time! Siegel and Bryson lead parents and children out of puzzling impasses and into mutual understanding and appreciation. The book gives them the tools and courage needed to face the challenges of our rapidly changing world.” —Wendy Mogel, author of The Blessing of a Skinned Knee and The Blessing of a B-
 
“In the flurry of activity that makes up our day-to-day parenting lives, it is easy to lose sight of the big picture: we aren’t just raising children; we’re raising adults. The Yes Brain offers clear strategies for fostering balance, empathy, and self-regulation in our children to not only help them manage today’s bumps and tumbles, but to nurture in them the resources that will allow them to enjoy happy, healthy grown-up lives. An invaluable resource that I’ll be recommending to parents for years to come!” Susan Stiffelman, MFT, author of Parenting Without Power Struggles

About the Author

Daniel J. Siegel, M.D., is clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, the founding co-director of the UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center, and executive director of the Mindsight Institute. A graduate of Harvard Medical School, Dr. Siegel is the author of several books, including the New York Times bestsellers Brainstorm, Mind, and, with Tina Payne Bryson, The Whole-Brain Child and No-Drama Discipline. He is also the author of the bestsellers Mindsight and, with Mary Hartzell, Parenting from the Inside Out. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, with welcome visits from their adult son and daughter.

Tina Payne Bryson, Ph.D., is the co-author, with Daniel J. Siegel, of two New York Times bestsellers, The Whole-Brain Child and No-Drama Discipline. She is the founder and executive director of the Center for Connection, an interdisciplinary clinical team in Pasadena, California. She is a licensed clinical social worker, providing pediatric and adolescent psychotherapy and parenting consultations. As well, she keynotes conferences and conducts workshops for parents, educators, and clinicians all over the world. Dr. Bryson earned her Ph.D. from the University of Southern California and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

The Yes Brain:

An Introduction

This book is about helping kids say yes to the world. It’s about encouraging them to open their minds to new challenges, to new opportunities, to who they already are and all they can become. It’s about giving them a Yes Brain.

If you’ve heard Dan speak, you may have participated in an exercise where he asks his audience to close their eyes and pay attention to their bodily and emotional responses when he repeats a particular word. He begins by somewhat harshly saying “no” over and over again. He repeats it seven times, then switches to “yes,” which he says much more gently, again and again. He then asks the audience members to open their eyes and describe what they experienced. They report that the “no” portion of the exercise left them feeling shut down, upset, tense, and defensive, whereas when Dan repeated the affirming “yes,” they felt open, calm, relaxed, and lighter. The muscles of their face and vocal cords relaxed, their breathing and heart rate normalized, and they became more open, as opposed to restricted or insecure or oppositional. (Feel free to close your eyes now and try the exercise for yourself. Maybe enlist the help of a relative or friend. Notice what goes on in your body as you repeatedly hear the word “no,” and then “yes.”)

These two different responses—­the “yes” response and the “no” response—­give you an idea of what we mean when we talk about a Yes Brain, as well as its opposite, a No Brain. If you expand that and think about it as an overall outlook on life, a No Brain leaves you feeling reactive when you interact with people, which makes it nearly impossible to listen, make good decisions, or connect with and care for another person. A focus on survival and self-­defense kicks into gear, leaving you feeling guarded and shut down when it comes to interacting with the world and learning new lessons. Your nervous system initiates its reactive fight-­flight-­freeze-­or-­faint response: fight means lashing out, flight means escaping, freeze means temporarily immobilizing yourself, and faint means collapsing and feeling utterly helpless. Any of these four reactive responses to threat can become triggered, preventing you from being open, connecting to others, and offering flexible responses. That’s the reactive No Brain state.

The Yes Brain, in contrast, emerges from different circuits in the brain that become activated and lead to receptivity rather than reactivity. Scientists use the term “social engagement system” to refer to the set of neural circuits that help us connect openly with others—­and even our own inner experience. As a result of receptivity and an active social engagement system, we feel much more capable of addressing challenges in a strong, clear, and flexible way. In this Yes Brain state, we open ourselves to a sense of equanimity and harmony, allowing us to absorb, assimilate, and learn from new information.

This Yes Brain mindset is what we want for our kids, so that they learn to view obstacles and new experiences not as paralyzing impediments but simply as challenges to be faced and overcome and learned from. When kids work from a Yes Brain mentality, they’re more flexible, more open to compromise, more willing to take chances and explore. They’re more curious and imaginative, less worried about making mistakes. They’re also less rigid and stubborn, which makes them better at relationships and more adaptable and resilient when it comes to handling adversity. They understand themselves and work from a clear internal compass that directs their decisions as well as the way they treat others. Guided by their Yes Brain, they do more, learn more, and become more. They say yes to the world from a place of emotional equilibrium, welcoming all that life offers—­even when circumstances don’t go their way.

Our opening message to you is a thrilling one: you have the power to promote this type of flexibility, receptivity, and resilience in your children. This is what we mean by mental strength—­giving your kids a strong mind. Not by making them attend a lecture series on grit and curiosity, or by initiating lots of long, intense, stare-­into-­each-­other’s-­eyes conversations. In fact, your everyday interactions with your children are all you need. Simply by keeping in mind the Yes Brain principles and lessons we’ll show you in the coming pages, you can use the time you spend with your kids—­while driving to school, eating dinner, playing together, or even arguing with them—­to influence the way they respond to their circumstances and interact with the people around them.

That’s because a Yes Brain is more than just a mindset or an approach to the world. It’s that, definitely. And as such, it gives your child an internal guide to help him or her face life’s challenges with security and enthusiasm. It’s the basis of being strong from the inside out. But a Yes Brain is also a neurological state that emerges when the brain is engaged in certain ways. By understanding a few basic details about brain development, you can help create an environment that provides opportunities that will foster a Yes Brain in your kids.

As we’ll explain below, the Yes Brain is created by neural activity that involves a particular region of the brain called the prefrontal cortex, an area that links many regions with one another, handles higher-­order thinking, and facilitates curiosity, resilience, compassion, insight, open-­mindedness, problem-­solving, and even morality. Kids can learn to increasingly access and pay attention to the functions of this part of the brain as they grow and develop. In other words, you can teach your kids how to grow this important neural area that supports mental strength. As a result, they can control their emotions and bodies better, while also listening more carefully to their inner promptings and being more fully themselves. That’s what we’re talking about when we discuss the Yes Brain: a neurological state that helps children (and adults) approach the world with openness, resilience, empathy, and authenticity.

A No Brain, in contrast, emerges less from the interconnecting prefrontal cortex and more from a less integrated brain state that involves the activity of lower, more primitive regions of the brain. This No Brain state is how we respond to a threat or get ready for an impending attack. As a result, it’s intensely reactive, defensively worrying that it might make a mistake or that curiosity might lead to some kind of trouble. And this state can go on the offense, too, pushing back on new knowledge and fighting off input from others. Attacking and rejecting are two ways the No Brain deals with the world. The No Brain’s outlook on the world is one of stubbornness, anxiety, competition, and threat, leaving it much less capable of handling difficult situations or achieving a clear understanding of self or others.

Kids who approach the world from a No Brain state are at the mercy of their circumstances and their feelings. They get stuck in their emotions, unable to shift them, and they complain about their realities rather than finding healthy ways to respond to them. They worry, often obsessively, about facing something new or making a mistake, rather than making decisions in a Yes Brain spirit of openness and curiosity. Stubbornness often rules the day in a No Brain state.

Does any of that sound similar to your situation at home? If you have kids, it probably does. The truth is, we all get into No Brain states—­kids and adults alike. Becoming rigid and/or reactive from time to time is something we can’t completely avoid. But we can understand it. Then we can learn ways to help our kids return more quickly to a Yes Brain state when they leave it. And more important, we can give them the tools to do so themselves. Young children will work from a No Brain state more often than older children and adults. A seemingly omnipresent No Brain is typical and developmentally appropriate for a three-­year-­old—­like when she cries with fury because her harmonica got wet, even though she’s the one who threw it in the sink full of water! But over time, and as development unfolds, we can support our kids in developing the ability to regulate themselves, bounce back from difficulties, understand their own ­experiences, and be thoughtful of others. Then, more and more, the no becomes a yes.

Think about that right now, for just a moment. How would life at your house change if your kids were better at responding to everyday situations—­conflict with siblings, turning off electronics, following directions, homework struggles, bedtime battles—­from a Yes Brain instead of reacting from a No Brain? What would be different if they were less rigid and stubborn and they could better regulate themselves when things don’t go their way? What if they welcomed new experiences instead of fearing them? What if they could be clearer about their own feelings, and more caring and empathic toward others? How much happier would they be? How much happier and more peaceful would the whole family be?

That’s what this book is about: helping develop a Yes Brain in your kids by giving them the space, the opportunity, and the tools to develop into people who openly engage with their world and become fully and authentically themselves. This is how we help children develop mental strength and resilience.

Nurturing a Yes Brain Is Not About Being Permissive

Let us be clear from the outset about what the Yes Brain is not. The Yes Brain is not about telling kids yes all the time. It’s not about being permissive, or giving in, or protecting them from disappointment, or rescuing them from difficult situations. Nor is it about creating a compliant child who robotically minds his parents without thinking for himself. Instead, it’s about helping kids begin to realize who they are and who they are becoming, and that they can overcome disappointment and defeat and choose a life full of connection and meaning. Chapters 2 and 3 especially will discuss the importance of allowing children to understand that frustrations and setbacks are an inherent part of life—­and supporting them while they learn that lesson.

After all, the result of a Yes Brain is not a person who is happy all the time or who never experiences any problems or negative feelings. That’s not the point at all. It’s not the goal of life, nor is it possible. The Yes Brain leads not to some sort of perfection or paradise, but to the ability to find joy and meaning even in the midst of life’s challenges. It allows a person to feel grounded and understand themselves, to flexibly learn and adapt, and to live with a sense of purpose. It leads them not only to survive difficult situations, but to emerge from them stronger and wiser. That’s how they can develop meaning in their lives. From their Yes Brain they’re also able to engage with their inner life, with others, and with the world. That’s what we mean by having a life of connection and knowing who we are.

When kids and adolescents also develop the ability for equanimity—­for learning the skill of returning to a Yes Brain state after being in No Brain mode—­we’ve given them an important components of resilience. The ancient Greeks had a term for this kind of happiness composed of meaning, connection, and peaceful contentedness. They called it eudaimonia, and it’s one of the most empowering and lasting gifts we can give our children. It helps create the kind of successful life we can prepare our kids for if we allow them to mature into their own individual identities while supporting them and building skills along the way. And, of course, by working on our own Yes Brain.

Let’s face it: in many ways kids are growing up in a No Brain world. Think about a traditional school day, full of rules and regulations, standardized tests, rote memorization, and one-­size-­fits-­all discipline techniques. Whew! And they have to deal with that six hours a day, five days a week, for nine months of the year? Yikes. On top of that, consider the oh-­so-­packed schedules so many of us impose on them, full of “enrichment” classes and tutoring and other activities that leave them staying up late and losing sleep because they have to get their homework done because they couldn’t do it during the daylight hours since they were so busy being “enriched.” When we add to this how compelling digital media has become, with auditory and visual stimuli capturing our kids’ attention around the clock with a temporary pleasure the Greeks called hedonia, we can realize that cultivating a Yes Brain is especially important in these modern times to empower our kids with true and lasting happiness, with the eudaimonia of meaning, connection, and equanimity.

These digital distractions and busy schedules are often experiences that fail to ignite—­and at times even undermine—­Yes Brain thought. Some of them may actually offer enriching experiences, and some may be necessary evils (although we’re not convinced how necessary certain commonly accepted educational practices really are, as evidenced by the inspirational work being done all over the country and the world by educators who are challenging the status quo in the areas of homework, class schedules, and discipline). Yes, of course kids need to learn about managing routines, following a calendar, and completing tasks that aren’t necessarily pleasant or fun. You’ll hear us endorse that idea throughout the book. Our main point here is simply that when you consider how many of a child’s waking hours are spent doing No Brain work or engaged in No Brain activities, it becomes that much more important that we strive to offer them Yes Brain interactions whenever we possibly can. We want to make home a place where a “yes” approach is consistently emphasized and prioritized.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Kindle Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Poorly organized book, but in a nut shell: Calm, Teach/Redirect
Reviewed in the United States on August 20, 2019
CONNECT = Help calm the kid down, sooth, safe, loved and supportive. Use empathic voice so they feel understood and listened to. Soft facial expressions. Stay at or below eye level. Gently touch them. Acknowledge feelings as real and important, even if you don’t feel... See more
CONNECT = Help calm the kid down, sooth, safe, loved and supportive. Use empathic voice so they feel understood and listened to. Soft facial expressions. Stay at or below eye level. Gently touch them. Acknowledge feelings as real and important, even if you don’t feel they are. “You really wanted to watch another TV show. Are you feeling sad or mad? Yes, that is hard. I get it. I’m right here and understand.” Smile. The child only moves back to balance and regulation after the experience and they believe your empathy and connection at a deep level. Kids misbehave because they cannot control their emotions, not because they do NOT want to. The behavior is the message that they don’t have the skills that is causing the frustration or anger.

TEACH/REDIRECT = (The child MUST be calm before starting this.) Explain what happened, or let the kid do so, discover together. Redirect toward better behavior and decision-making, and talk about other strategies to try next time a similar situation comes up. Hold them accountable for their behavior, including making things right and engaging in appropriate behavior/repairs. Have a “Re-Do”. Success relies heavily on our being calm and attuned to his feelings. Teach them that they can tolerate discomfort. Show them and tell them you have complete faith in their ability. Children must always be held accountable and respectful even if the kid is stuck in bad feelings. You can stop destructive behavior and remove the child before you teach/redirect. Do not focus on punishment but on teaching. Teach kids to repair after conflict-teach them to be responsible.

LEARN to CONTROL ANGER = What are other BETTER ways they can express that anger. Teach them to become aware the moment when they get upset, pause and then use calming techniques. There is nothing wrong with getting upset, it is normal. How we express that anger is important. And how quickly we calm ourselves down is important. Teach them to use calming techniques: put hand on stomach and heart and listen to it and calm both down. Slow breathing. Count to ten. Have a cigarette. Body awareness.

Roll play trigger situations with your child can develop skills. Teach them resilience: the ability to bounce back when life’s inevitable problems and struggles arise Roll play or play games so the child loses, and get the kids to use these skills then. Practice small frustrations and move to more difficult situations. Know the triggers that cause your child to imbalance. Notice how long it takes for the child to calm down. Recognize and congratulate small accomplishments. Let them wrestle with indecision, discomfort, discouragement and disappointment. Do not rescue them from these, our job is to walk them through their difficult moments with connection and empathy, to be active participants in the problem-solving. If we push them too hard before they are ready it can backfire, making them more fearful.

Kids need play time. Avoid excessive electronics! Kids need connection/game time with family/friends-critical for their emotional and neurological success. Kids need physical time-aerobically. Get your children into many social interactions, very important for human brain development and health-for the rest of their life-even as an adult. Long term isolation is very unhealthy. Constant hours of TV or internet watching or reading books for hours on end is unhealthy. Stay connected socially.

Withdrawal – Stress behavior. Due to social contact, new situations, feeling uneasy, lack of self-confidence. Calm, reassure and redirect. Roll play for practice. Listen to what is NOT said. Body language.

Empathy: Understand the perspective of another, help or take action to make things better. Ask questions like “Why do you think that baby is crying?” or “That woman wasn’t very nice to us, was she? Do you think something happened that made her feel mad today?” Teach kids to recognize other people’s point of view. Roll play. Avoid, “You should care more about…” Bring attention to victims with your children, discuss the event or situation. Teach the child to apologize empathically, not just “I’m sorry.” But “I can see how you must feel sad that I pushed you down the stairs and that was very scary for your, I am sorry and won’t do that again.” Children are selfish, self-centered and can be taught to be caring and compassionate for others, it takes time and practice. Do not overact to a selfish child. Live in the now, correct in the now, not something that happened hours, days, weeks ago. Let that go and only “live in the now”. Children will relapse into being selfish. Never tell a child, “You will never learn to…”

Parents who come from bad relationships/families can learn and use these techniques on their children and on themselves. Parents can and should learn to use empathy toward everyone including themselves. Modeling the empathy to the child is very important. The brain changes through repeat.

Sound decision making – get your kids to do this on their own as much as possible by enabling choice. Young children get choice between two good decisions, but keep pushing dilemmas to challenge them. Why did you make that choice? Why did you feel that way? Why don’t you think you’ll do well?

Recognize and celebrate all the small successes in life everyday!!!!
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Eli G
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Understandable, truly useful, and based on modern, real, science.
Reviewed in the United States on December 17, 2018
I won''t bother with the book details, they''re well covered in other reviews, so I''ll just say that I really can''t recommend these enough. Long story short, "The Whole Brain Child" and it''s two companion books by the same authors, "No Drama Discipline", and more... See more
I won''t bother with the book details, they''re well covered in other reviews, so I''ll just say that I really can''t recommend these enough.

Long story short, "The Whole Brain Child" and it''s two companion books by the same authors, "No Drama Discipline", and more recently "The Yes Brain" really have been the most useful parenting books I''ve encountered. (they are loosely coupled, so you can read any of them individually, in any order)

Of the 40 or so books (and zillion articles, studies, etc.) I gobbled up when we first found out we''d be expecting, these are the ones that really stand out, and that I can most hold up and say "I''m a better parent today than I otherwise would be, because I read this."

These aren''t read-once books for me - I still flip through them once in a while, as a refresher, three years later, and will probably continue to revisit them well into the future.

I also make it a habit to gift hardcover copies of all three books to anyone we know who''s expecting, along with an offer to buy them the e-book versions instead, if they''d rather have those.

Even the best parents have room for improvement, and I can''t really imagine anyone reading any of these without finding something that will add to their parenting skills.

Bottom line, if you believe parenting is a skill to be honed, if you want to parent thoughtfully and intentionally rather than just echoing your own parents methods (which may have been just fine), if you want your parenting to be in tune with the facts and empirical evidence provided by modern psychology and brain-science (which has improved greatly over the last 20 years or so), and if you want a better understanding of how your child''s mind works, how you can best guide that mind for long-term success, then please don''t miss these books.

What else can I say? Seriously, just buy the book - buy all three, if you can.

Your kids will probably never thank you for reading them, but they should =o)
34 people found this helpful
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Carol C.
4.0 out of 5 starsVine Customer Review of Free Product
Concrete, easy-to-read guidance on how to foster curiosity, resilience, and empathy in your child
Reviewed in the United States on September 13, 2017
As the mother of a 13 year old, I was delighted to have an opportunity to read this book. Who wouldn''t want to foster courage, curiosity, and resilience in her child? The book did not disappoint. It is well-written, insightful, and very easy to read. The authors provide... See more
As the mother of a 13 year old, I was delighted to have an opportunity to read this book. Who wouldn''t want to foster courage, curiosity, and resilience in her child? The book did not disappoint. It is well-written, insightful, and very easy to read. The authors provide plenty of anecdotal examples based on experiences with their clients, and is full of entertaining, relatable cartoon drawings depicting various scenarios.

Much of the advice seems to be tailored at dealing with younger children (elementary school age), but the guidance applies to older children as well. The authors remind us that a child''s brain is not yet fully formed, so he is, at times, incapable of controlling his emotions or responses to situations. When a child acts or responds in a certain way, rather than criticizing and condemning the behavior, we should seek to understand it, and help the child learn how to cope better to perhaps respond differently in the future. The focus is on empathetic parenting and is a reminder for the need to be patient when parenting.

The authors discuss three "zones" -- a red zone, full of rage and anger and frustration; a blue zone, which is detached and checked out; and a green zone -- the good place to be. They talk about figuring out your child''s tolerance for conflict and steps you can take to broaden the green zone, or help your child move back into the green zone when they are angry or scared.

To promote resilience, the authors recommend that you shower your children with the four S''s -- make them feel safe, seen, soothed, and secure. You want to create a safe environment where they can try new things, express concerns without negative repercussions, responding to their anger with calmness and understanding rather than being angry because they are angry. It''s hard. It''s really hard. Young teenagers especially can say some pretty mean things toward their parents -- but I''ll just keep reminding myself that the teenaged brain is not yet fully developed.

As the authors point out, people who are caring and empathetic are generally less frustrated, less angry, less judgmental --- and no doubt happier in life. The book gives guidance on how to help nurture your child''s ability to react with empathy to others. By encouraging and children to be empathetic using the language and guidance provide, we can actually help rewire our children''s brains. There''s a lot here about neuroplasticity and the ability to change how we''re wired. It sounds promising --

All of this is easier said than done. I was pumped up with all sorts of ideas on how to promote positivity after reading this delightful book. But reading a book is no guarantee of successful implementation of the techniques therein -- and that is easier said than done. I''m working on it.
104 people found this helpful
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J. Pendergrass
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Must read for ALL Parents
Reviewed in the United States on January 16, 2018
I have read Whole Brain Child, No Drama Discipline and Parenting from the Insight Out. The Yes Brain expands on those books, but even more exciting has sections for us as parents to reflect on ourselves. I really love the exercises and cartoons, which engage my 4 year old.... See more
I have read Whole Brain Child, No Drama Discipline and Parenting from the Insight Out. The Yes Brain expands on those books, but even more exciting has sections for us as parents to reflect on ourselves. I really love the exercises and cartoons, which engage my 4 year old. Definitely worth the read to help build resilience and courage! Easy to see where I can improve on seeing, hearing and being there for my kid, and nuture their inner spark. (And while working our way thru tantrums).
45 people found this helpful
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Book obsessed
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The tips are good and he is one of my favorite parenting experts
Reviewed in the United States on April 19, 2018
I''m a huge Fan Siegel fan and this book just is not on the same level as his other stuff. It constantly paraphrased and mentioned his other books. I bought this for original content, not as a review of his previous content. The tips are good and he is one of my favorite... See more
I''m a huge Fan Siegel fan and this book just is not on the same level as his other stuff. It constantly paraphrased and mentioned his other books. I bought this for original content, not as a review of his previous content. The tips are good and he is one of my favorite parenting experts. I just wish there was newer, more original content.
21 people found this helpful
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Mary J. Snyder
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I really found this useful. I wish I had gotten it in print ...
Reviewed in the United States on March 27, 2018
I really found this useful. I wish I had gotten it in print as I would have tabbed it. Also, the cartoons are difficult to read in the Kindle version. I do want to go back and show them to my son (they have chapter summaries to share with your kids). The red/green/blue zone... See more
I really found this useful. I wish I had gotten it in print as I would have tabbed it. Also, the cartoons are difficult to read in the Kindle version. I do want to go back and show them to my son (they have chapter summaries to share with your kids). The red/green/blue zone idea was key to breaking through a barrier I was facing with my son. I plan to read their other books and I hope they are as good as this one is.
13 people found this helpful
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Rachel Toalson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An empowering read for parents
Reviewed in the United States on February 23, 2019
The books of Daniel Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson are some of the most helpful, liberating, and enlightening books on my parenting shelf, and THE YES BRAIN is no exception. With helpful examples from their therapy careers and their experience raising kids, Siegel and Bryson... See more
The books of Daniel Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson are some of the most helpful, liberating, and enlightening books on my parenting shelf, and THE YES BRAIN is no exception. With helpful examples from their therapy careers and their experience raising kids, Siegel and Bryson equip parents with specific techniques and practices guaranteed to strengthen their relationships with their children and, at the same time, better understand how to raise kids to become who they were made to be. Empowering, helpful, life-changing.
2 people found this helpful
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Evan A longfield
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Awesome Resource for Parents and Kids
Reviewed in the United States on June 13, 2019
I’m not even finished reading the book, and I already have so much insight into how my young kids think and ways to communicate better with them. We use the Red/Blue/Green to discuss our emotions frequently. My 5 year old especially seems to really like the explanation of... See more
I’m not even finished reading the book, and I already have so much insight into how my young kids think and ways to communicate better with them. We use the Red/Blue/Green to discuss our emotions frequently. My 5 year old especially seems to really like the explanation of his brain: how it works and the ways it’s growing.
One person found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Trixie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Easy to read book for no drama parenting
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 1, 2020
We love this book, and the other books by the same authors (“The Whole Brained Child” and “No Drama Discipline “). They overlap slightly so it’s helpful to read as a set IMO. We find they fit really well with our parenting ethos and more importantly we better understand our...See more
We love this book, and the other books by the same authors (“The Whole Brained Child” and “No Drama Discipline “). They overlap slightly so it’s helpful to read as a set IMO. We find they fit really well with our parenting ethos and more importantly we better understand our daughters. Using this methodology has meant less fights, more compromises, and generally happier family times! No more toddler standoffs is a real win! I couldn’t recommend them more thoroughly.
4 people found this helpful
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roger marriage
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
excellent advice, hard going could have been condensed into 20 pages
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 11, 2018
Excellent advice on fostering resilience, positivity and a growth mindset in your kids. Has influenced the way I deal with my own kids and those I teach. Some useful cartoons you can use with your kids. Hard going to read because it is padded out so much to make a book,...See more
Excellent advice on fostering resilience, positivity and a growth mindset in your kids. Has influenced the way I deal with my own kids and those I teach. Some useful cartoons you can use with your kids. Hard going to read because it is padded out so much to make a book, could have been concisely written in 20 pages.
7 people found this helpful
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IndyCurl
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A single idea strung out into a whole.book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 22, 2020
Some useful ideas hidden in a lot of pointless text. Yet another Siegel ans Bryson spin off book where one idea is strung out over a whole book, when it merits no more than a chapter. Disappointed. Stick to Whole Brain Chils
One person found this helpful
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Miss Ruth Crofts
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Delightful insight into children’s brain and emotional development
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 20, 2020
Purchased for some young parent friends and they loved this easy access self help styled guide to parenting.
One person found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very user friendly. Anyone can apply it with their children.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 14, 2018
So we''ll written and easy to use strategies. I love the gentle way of guiding the child to develop beautifully. I have been using the strategies with our 2 year old son and it''s already showing great benefits. Highly recommend it for parents and teachers /child carer staff.See more
So we''ll written and easy to use strategies. I love the gentle way of guiding the child to develop beautifully. I have been using the strategies with our 2 year old son and it''s already showing great benefits. Highly recommend it for parents and teachers /child carer staff.
3 people found this helpful
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